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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
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id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 105 of 119 (4/p)
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02 - Variations Under Nature 02-01 - Variability 10 BEFORE applying the principles arrived at in the last chapter to organic beings in a state of nature, we must briefly discuss whether these latter are subject to any variation.

To treat this subject properly, a long catalogue of dry facts ought to be given; but these shall reserve for a future work.

Nor shall I here discuss the various definitions which have been given of the term species.

No one definition has satisfied all naturalists; yet every naturalist knows vaguely what he means when he speaks of a species.

Generally the term includes the unknown element of a distant act of creation. The term "variety" is almost equally difficult to define; but here community of descent is almost universally implied, though it can rarely be proved.

We have also what are called monstrosities; but they graduate into varieties.

By a monstrosity I presume is meant some considerable deviation of structure, generally injurious, or not useful to the species.

Some authors use the term "variation" in a technical sense, as implying a modification directly due to the physical conditions of life; and "variations" in this sense are supposed not to be inherited; but who can say that the dwarfed condition of shells in the brackish waters of the Baltic, or dwarfed plants on Alpine summits, or the thicker fur of an animal from far northwards, would not in some cases be inherited for at least a few generations?

And in this case I presume that the form would be called a variety.

Sea Shell
Sea Shell
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-10 - Methodical and Unconscious Selection 10 At the present time, eminent breeders try by methodical selection, with a distinct object in view, to make a new strain or sub-breed, superior to anything of the kind in the country.

But, for our purpose, a form of Selection, which may be called Unconscious, and which results from every one trying to possess and breed from the best individual animals, is more important.

Thus, a man who intends keeping pointers naturally tries to get as good dogs as he can, and afterwards breeds from his own best dogs, but he has no wish or expectation of permanently altering the breed.

dog
dog


Nevertheless we may infer that this process, continued during centuries, would improve and modify any breed, in the same way as Bakewell, Collins, &c., by this very same process, only carried on more methodically, did greatly modify, even during their lifetimes, the forms and qualities of their cattle.

cattle
cattle


Slow and insensible changes of this kind can never be recognised unless actual measurements or careful drawings of the breeds in question have been made long ago, which may serve for comparison. In some cases, however, unchanged, or but little changed individuals of the same breed exist in less civilised districts, where the breed has been less improved.

There is reason to believe that King Charles's spaniel has been unconsciously modified to a large extent since the time of that monarch.

Some highly competent authorities are convinced that the setter is directly derived from the spaniel, and has probably been slowly altered from it.

spaniel
spaniel

Irish Setter
Irish Setter


It is known that the English pointer has been greatly changed within the last century, and in this case the change has, it is believed, been chiefly effected by crosses with the foxhound; but what concerns us is, that the change has been effected unconsciously and gradually, and yet so effectually, that, though the old Spanish pointer certainly came from Spain, Mr. Borrow has not seen, as I am informed by him, any native dog in Spain like our pointer.

English Pointer
English Pointer

foxhound
foxhound
05 - Laws of Variation 05-08 - Parts Developed in an Unusual Manner are Highly Variable 30 As with birds the individuals of the same species, inhabiting the same country, vary extremely little, I have particularly attended to them; and the rule certainly seems to hold good in this class.

bird
bird


I cannot make out that it applies to plants, and this would have seriously shaken my belief in its truth, had not the great variability in plants made it particularly difficult to compare their relative degrees of variability.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-05 - Diversified Habits in the Same Species 20 As we sometimes see individuals following habits different from those proper to their species and to the other species of the same genus, we might expect that such individuals would occasionally give rise to new species, having anomalous habits, and with their structure either slightly or considerably modified from that of their type. And such instances occur in nature.

Can a more striking instance of adaptation be given than that of a woodpecker for climbing trees and seizing insects in the chinks of the bark?

Yet in North America there are woodpeckers which feed largely on fruit, and others with elongated wings which chase insects on the wing.
North America
North America

woodpecker
woodpecker

fruit
fruit

insect
insect


On the plains of La Plata, where hardly a tree grows, there is a woodpecker (Colaptes campestris) which has two toes before and two behind, a long pointed tongue, pointed tail-feathers, sufficiently stiff to support the bird in a vertical position on a post, but not so stiff as in the typical woodpeckers, and a straight strong beak.

La Plata
La Plata

Colaptes Campestris
Colaptes Campestris


The beak, however, is not so straight or so strong as in the typical woodpeckers, but it is strong enough to bore into wood.

Hence this Colaptes in all the essential parts of its structure is a woodpecker.

Even in such trifling characters as the colouring, the harsh tone of the voice, and undulatory flight, its close blood-relationship to our common woodpecker is plainly declared; yet, as I can assert, not only from my own observation, but from those of the accurate Azara, in certain large districts it does not climb trees, and it makes its nest in holes in banks!

In certain other districts, however, this same woodpecker, as Mr. Hudson states, frequents trees, and bores holes in the trunk for its nest. I may mention as another illustration of the varied habits of this genus, that a Mexican Colaptes has been described by De Saussure as boring holes into hard wood in order to lay up a store of acorns.
Mexican Jay
Mexican Jay

acorn
acorn