M Database Inspector (cheetah)
Not logged in. Login

OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 74 of 119 (4/p)
1 20 30 40 50 60 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 90 100 110 119

Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by description desc limit 292, 4 (Page 74: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is last)
02 - Variations Under Nature 02-07 - Summary 20 In all these respects the species of large genera present a strong analogy with varieties. And we can clearly understand these analogies, if species once existed as varieties, and thus originated; whereas, these analogies are utterly inexplicable if species are independent creations.

We have, also, seen that it is the most flourishing or dominant species of the larger genera within each class which on an average yield the greatest number of varieties; and varieties, as we shall hereafter see, tend to become converted into new and distinct species.

Thus the larger genera tend to become larger; and throughout nature the forms of life which are now dominant tend to become still more dominant by leaving many modified and dominant descendants.

But by steps hereafter to be explained, the larger genera also tend to break u into smaller genera. And thus, the forms of life throughout the universe become divided into groups subordinate to groups.
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-04 - Rapid Increase of naturalised Animals and Plants 20 In a state of nature almost every full-grown plant annually produces seed, and amongst animals there are very few which do not annually pair. Hence we may confidently assert, that all plants and animals are tending to increase at a geometrical ratio,- that all would rapidly stock every station in which they could anyhow exist,- and that this geometrical tendency to increase must. be checked by destruction at some period of life.

Our familiarity with the larger domestic animals tends, I think, to mislead us: we see no great destruction falling on them, but we do not keep in mind that thousands are annually slaughtered for food, and that in a state of nature an equal number would have somehow to be disposed of.
04 - Natural Selection 04-11 - Divergence of Character 160 In a large genus it is probable that more than one species would vary.
Full Size

In the diagram I have assumed that a second species (I) has produced, by analogous steps, after ten thousand generations, either two well-marked varieties (w10 and z10) or two species, according to the amount of change supposed to be represented between the horizontal lines.

After fourteen thousand generations, six new species, marked by the letters n14 to z14, are supposed to have been produced. In any genus, the species which are already very different in character from each other, will generally tend to produce the greatest number of modified descendants; for these will have the best chance of seizing on new and widely different places in the polity of nature: hence in the diagram I have chosen the extreme species (A), and the nearly extreme species (I), as those which have largely varied, and have given rise to new varieties and species.

The other nine species (marked by capital letters) of our original genus, may for long but unequal periods continue to transmit unaltered descendants; and this is shown in the diagram by the dotted lines unequally prolonged upwards.
04 - Natural Selection 04-06 - On the generality of Intercross Between Individuals of the Same Species 10 Illustrations of the Action of Natural Selection:
Full Size