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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 86 of 119 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by description desc limit 340, 4 (Page 86: Row)
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05 - Laws of Variation 05-03 - Acclimatisation 30 How much of the acclimatisation of species to any peculiar climate is due to mere habit, and how much to the natural selection of varieties having different innate constitutions, and how much to both means combined, is an obscure question.

That habit or custom has some influence, I must believe, both from analogy and from the incessant advice given in agricultural works, even in the ancient encyclopaedias of China, to be very cautious in transporting animals from one district to another.

China
China


And as it is not likely that man should have succeeded in selecting so many breeds and sub-breeds with constitutions specially fitted for their own districts, the result must, I think, be due to habit.

On the other hand, natural selection would inevitably tend to preserve those individuals which were born with constitutions best adapted to any country which they inhabited.

In treatises on many kinds of cultivated plants, certain varieties are said to withstand certain climates better than others; this is strikingly shown in works on fruit-trees published in the United States, in which certain varieties are habitually recommended for the northern and others for the southern States; and as most of these varieties are of recent origin, they cannot owe their constitutional differences to habit.

The case of the Jerusalem artichoke, which is never propagated in England by seed, and of which consequently new varieties have not been produced, has even been advanced, as proving that acclimatisation cannot be effected, for it is now as tender as ever it was!

Jerusalem
Jerusalem

artichoke
artichoke

England
England


The case, also, of the kidney-bean has been often cited for a similar purpose, and with much greater weight; but until someone will sow, during a score of generations, his kidney-beans so early that a very large proportion are destroyed by frost, and then collect seed from the few survivors, with care to prevent accidental crosses, and then again get seed from these seedlings, with the same precautions, the experiment cannot be said to have been
tried.

Kidney Bean
Kidney Bean


Nor let it be supposed that differences in the constitution of seedling kidney-beans never appear, for an account has been published how much more hardy some seedlings are than others; and of this fact I have myself observed striking instances.

seedlings
seedlings
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-10 - Struggle for Life most severe between Individuals and Varieties of the same Species 20 How frequently we hear of one species of rat taking the place of another species under the most different climates!

In Russia the small Asiatic cockroach has everywhere driven before it its great congener.

rat
rat

Russia
Russia

cockroach
cockroach


In Australia the imported hive-bee is rapidly exterminating the small, stingless native bee. One species of charlock has been known to supplant another species; and so in other cases.

Australia
Australia

Hive Bee
Hive Bee

charlock
charlock


We can dimly see why the competition should be most severe between allied forms, which fill nearly the same place in the economy of nature; but probably in no one case could we precisely say why one species has been victorious over another in the great battle of life.
05 - Laws of Variation 05-04 - Correlation of Growth 20 Homologous parts, as has been remarked by some authors, tend to cohere; this is often seen in monstrous plants: and nothing is more common than the union of homologous parts in normal structures, as in the union of the petals into a tube.

petal
petal


Hard parts seem to affect the form of adjoining soft parts; it is believed by some authors that with birds the diversity in the shape of the pelvis causes the remarkable diversity in the shape of their kidneys.

bird
bird

pelvis
pelvis

kidney
kidney


Others believe that the shape of the pelvis in the human mother influences by pressure the shape of the head of the child.

In snakes, according to Schlegel, the form of the body and the manner of swallowing determine the position and form of several of the most important viscera.
snake
snake

Hermann Schlegel
Hermann Schlegel
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-04 - Transitions in Habits of Life 20 Here, as on other occasions, I lie under a heavy disadvantage, for, out of the many striking cases which I have collected, I can only give one or two instances of transitional habits and structures in allied species; and of diversified habits, either constant or occasional, in the same species.

And it seems to me that nothing less than a long list of such cases is sufficient to lessen the difficulty in any particular case like that of the bat.
bat
bat