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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 20 of 119 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by ordinal desc limit 76, 4 (Page 20: Row)
subject
title
ordinal Desending Order (top row is last)
description
04 - Natural Selection 04-07 - Illustrations of the Action of Natural Selection: 70 I will give only one, as likewise illustrating one step in the separation of the sexes of plants.
04 - Natural Selection 04-09 - Circumstances favourable for the production of new forms through Natural Selection 70 Lapse of time is only so far important, and its importance in this respect is great, that it gives a better chance of beneficial variations arising and of their being selected, accumulated, and fixed. It likewise tends to increase the direct action of the physical conditions of life, in relation to the constitution of each organism.

If we turn to nature to test the truth of these remarks, and look at any small isolated area, such as an oceanic island, although the number of species inhabiting it is small, as we shall see in our chapter on Geographical Distribution; yet of these species a very large proportion are endemic,- that is, have been produced there and nowhere else in the world. Hence an oceanic island at first sight seems to have been highly favourable for the production of new species.

island
island

Galapagos Islands
Galapagos Islands

Galapagos Tortoise
Galapagos Tortoise
04 - Natural Selection 04-11 - Divergence of Character 70 By considering the nature of the plants or animals which have in any country struggled successfully with the indigenes and have there become naturalised, we may gain some crude idea in what manner some of the natives would have to be modified, in order to gain an advantage over their compatriots; and we may at least infer that diversification of structure, amounting to new generic differences, would be profitable to them.
04 - Natural Selection 04-12 - On the Degree to which Organisation tends to advance 70 But to suppose that most of the many now existing low forms have not in the least advanced since the first dawn of life would be extremely rash; for every naturalist who has dissected some of the beings now ranked as very low in the scale, must have been struck with their really wondrous and beautiful organisation.

Nearly the same remarks are applicable if we look to the different grades of organisation within the same great group; for instance, in the vertebrata, to the co-existence of mammals and fish- amongst mammalia, to the coexistence of man and the Ornithorhynchus- amongst fishes, to the co-existence of the shark and the lancelet (Amphioxus), which latter fish in the extreme simplicity of its structure approaches the invertebrate classes.

Ornithorhynchus
Ornithorhynchus

shark
shark

lancelet
lancelet