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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 100 of 119 (4/p)
1 40 50 60 70 80 90 94 95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 110 119

Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by ordinal limit 396, 4 (Page 100: Row)
subject
title
ordinal Desending Order (top row is first)
description
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 70 From these several reasons, namely,- the improbability of man having formerly made seven or eight supposed species of pigeons to breed freely under domestication;- these supposed species being quite unknown in a wild state, and their not having become anywhere feral;- these species presenting certain very abnormal characters, as compared with all other Columbidae, though so like the rock-pigeon in most respects;- the occasional reappearance of the blue colour and various black marks in all the breeds, both when kept pure and when crossed;- and lastly, the mongrel offspring being perfectly fertile;- from these several reasons taken together, we may safely conclude that all our domestic breeds are descended from the rock-pigeon or Columba livia with its geographical sub-species.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon
13 - Mutual Affinities of Organic Beings: Morphology: Embryology: Rudimentary Or 13-03 - Rules and difficulties in classification, explained on the theory of descent with modification 70 This case seems to me well to illustrate the spirit with which our classifications are sometimes necessarily founded.

Practically when naturalists are at work, they do not trouble themselves about the physiological value of the characters which they use in defining a group, or in allocating any particular species.

If they find a character nearly uniform, and common to a great number of forms, and not common to others, they use it as one of high value; if common to some lesser number, they use it as of subordinate value.

This principle has been broadly confessed by some naturalists to be the true one; and by none more clearly than by that excellent botanist, Aug. St. Hilaire.

Augustin Saint Hilaire
Augustin Saint Hilaire
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-03 - Causes of the general belief in the immutability of species 70 The existence of closely allied or representative species in any two areas, implies, on the theory of descent with modification, that the same parents formerly inhabited both areas; and we almost invariably find that wherever many closely allied species inhabit two areas, some identical species common to both still exist.

Wherever many closely allied yet distinct species occur, many doubtful forms and varieties of the same species likewise occur.

It is a rule of high generality that the inhabitants of each area are related to the inhabitants of the nearest source whence immigrants might have been derived.

We see this in nearly all the plants and animals of the Galapagos archipelago, of Juan Fernandez, and of the other American islands being related in the most striking manner to the plants and animals of the neighbouring American mainland; and those of the Cape de Verde archipelago and other African islands to the African mainland.

Galapagos Islands
Galapagos Islands

Juan Fernandez Islands
Juan Fernandez Islands


It must be admitted that these facts receive no explanation on the theory of creation.
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-02 - Recapitulation of the general and special circumstances in its favour 70 Many other facts are, as it seems to me, explicable on this theory.

How strange it is that a bird, under the form of woodpecker, should have been created to prey on insects on the ground; that upland geese, which never or rarely swim, should have been created with webbed feet; that a thrush should have been created to dive and feed on sub-aquatic insects; and that a petrel should have been created with habits and structure fitting it for the life of an auk or grebe! and so on in endless other cases.

woodpecker
woodpecker

insect
insect

Upland Goose
Upland Goose

thrush
thrush

petrel
petrel

auk
auk

grebe
grebe