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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 35 of 119 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by ordinal limit 136, 4 (Page 35: Row)
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01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-04 - Inheritance 20 Any variation which is not inherited is unimportant for us.

But the number and diversity of inheritable deviations of structure, both those of slight and those of considerable physiological importance, are endless. Dr. Prosper Lucas's treatise, in two large volumes, is the fullest and the best on this subject.

No breeder doubts how strong is the tendency to inheritance; that like produces like is his fundamental belief: doubts have been thrown on this principle only by theoretical writers.

When any deviation of structure often appears, and we see it in the father and child, we cannot tell whether it may not be due to the same cause having acted on both; but when amongst individuals, apparently exposed to the same conditions, any very rare deviation, due to some extraordinary combination of circumstances, appears in the parent- say, once amongst several million individuals- and it reappears in the child, the mere doctrine of chances almost compels us to attribute its reappearance to inheritance.

Every one must have heard of cases of albinism, prickly skin, hairy bodies, &c., appearing in several members of the same family.

If strange and rare deviations of structure are really inherited, less strange and commoner deviations may be freely admitted to be inheritable.

Perhaps the correct way of viewing the whole subject would be, to look at the inheritance of every character whatever as the rule, and non-inheritance as the anomaly?
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01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 20 In the skeletons of the several breeds, the development of the bones of the face in length and breadth and curvature differs enormously.

The shape, as well as the breadth and length of the ramus of the lower jaw, varies in a highly remarkable manner.

The caudal and sacral vertebrae vary in number; as does the number of the ribs, together with their relative breadth and the presence of processes.

The size and shape of the apertures in the sternum are highly variable; so is the degree of divergence and relative size of the two arms of the furcula.

The proportional width of the gape of mouth, the proportional length of the eyelids, of the orifice of the nostrils, of the tongue (not always in strict correlation with the length of beak), the size of the crop and of the upper part of the oesophagus; the development and abortion of the oil-gland; the number of the primary wing and caudal feathers; the relative length of the wing and tail to each other and to the body; the relative length of the leg and foot; the number of scutellae on the toes, the development of skin between the toes, are all points of structure which are variable.

The period at which the perfect plumage is acquired varies, as does the state of the down with which the nestling birds are clothed when hatched.

The shape and size of the eggs vary.

The manner of flight, and in some breeds the voice and disposition, differ remarkably.

Lastly, in certain breeds, the males and females have come to differ in a slight degree from each other.
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01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-12 - Circumstances favourable to Man's Power of Selection 20 With animals, facility in preventing crosses is an important element in the formation of new races,- at least, in a country which is already stocked with other races.

In this respect enclosure of the land plays a part. Wandering savages or the inhabitants of open plains rarely possess more than one breed of the same species.

Pigeons can be mated for life, and this is a great convenience to the fancier, for thus many races may be improved and kept true, though mingled in the same aviary; and this circumstance must have largely favoured the formation of new breeds.

Pigeons, I may add, can be propagated in great numbers and at a very quick rate, and inferior birds may be freely rejected, as when killed they serve for food.

pigeon
pigeon

aviary
aviary


On the other hand, cats from their nocturnal rambling habits
cannot be easily matched, and, although so much valued by women and children, we rarely see a distinct breed long kept up; such breeds as we do sometimes see are almost always imported from some other country.

Although I do not doubt that some domestic animals vary less than others, yet the rarity or absence of distinct breeds of the cat, the donkey, peacock, goose, &c., may be attributed in main part to selection not having been brought into play: in cats, from the difficulty in pairing them; in donkeys, from only a few being kept by poor people, and little attention paid to their breeding; for recently in
certain parts of Spain and of the United States this animal has been surprisingly modified and improved by careful selection: in peacocks, from not being very easily reared and a large stock not kept: in geese, from being valuable only for two purposes, food and feathers, and more especially from no pleasure having been felt in the display of distinct breeds.

cat
cat

donkey
donkey

peacock
peacock

goose
goose
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-06 - Difficulty of distinguishing between Varieties and Species 20 It has often been assumed that man has chosen for domestication animals and plants having an extraordinary inherent tendency to vary, and likewise to withstand diverse climates.

I do not dispute that these capacities have added largely to the value of most of our domesticated productions: but how could a savage possibly know, when he first tamed an animal, whether it would vary in succeeding generations, and whether it would endure other climates?

Has the little variability of the ass and goose, or the small power of endurance of warmth by the reindeer, or of cold by the common camel, prevented their domestication?

donkey (ass)
donkey (ass)

reindeer
reindeer

goose
goose

camel
camel

Snow Goose
Snow Goose

Snow Goose
Snow Goose


I cannot doubt that if other animals and plants, equal in number to our domesticated productions, and belonging to equally diverse classes and countries, were taken from a state of nature, and could be made to breed for an equal number of generations under domestication, they would on an average vary as largely as the parent species of our existing domesticated productions have varied.