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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 92 of 119 (4/p)
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04 - Natural Selection 04-12 - On the Degree to which Organisation tends to advance 60 Science has not as yet proved the truth of this belief, whatever the future may reveal.

On our theory the continued existence of lowly organisms offers no difficulty; for natural selection, or the survival of the fittest, does not necessarily include progressive development- it only takes advantage of such variations as arise and are beneficial to each creature under its complex relations of life.

And it may be asked what advantage, as far as we can see, would it be to an infusorian animalcule- to an intestinal
worm- or even to an earthworm, to be highly organised.

earthworm
earthworm


If it were no advantage, these forms would be left, by natural selection, unimproved or but little improved, and might remain for indefinite ages in their present lowly condition.

And geology tells us that some of the lowest forms, as the infusoria and rhizopods, have remained for an enormous period in nearly their present state.

rhizopod
rhizopod
05 - Laws of Variation 05-12 - Reversion to Long Lost Characters 60 In the north-west part of India the kattywar breed of horses is so generally striped, that, as I hear from Colonel Poole, who examined this breed for the Indian Government, a horse without stripes is not considered as purely-bred.

India
India

Kathiwari Horse
Kathiwari Horse


The spine is always striped; the legs are generally barred; and the shoulder-stripe, which is sometimes double and sometimes treble, is common; the side of the face, moreover, is sometimes striped.

The stripes are often plainest in the foal; and sometimes quite disappear in old horses.

Colonel Poole has seen both gray and bay kattywar horses striped when first foaled. I have also reason to suspect, from information given me by Mr. W. W. Edwards, that with the English race-horse the spinal stripe is much commoner in the foal than in the fullgrown animal.
Race Horse
Race Horse


I have myself recently bred a foal from a bay mare (offspring of a Turkoman horse and a Flemish mare) by a bay English race-horse; this foal when a week old was marked on its hinder quarters and on its forehead with numerous, very narrow, dark, zebra-like bars, and its legs were feebly striped: all the stripes soon disappeared completely.

Turkoman Horse
Turkoman Horse


Without here entering on further details, I may state that I have collected cases of leg and shoulder stripes in horses of very different breeds in various countries from Britain to eastern China; and from Norway in the north to the Malay Archipelago in the south. In all parts of the world these stripes occur far oftenest in duns and mouse-duns; by the term dun a large range of colour is included, from one between brown and black to a close approach to
cream-colour.

horses
horses

England
England

China
China

Norway
Norway

Malayan archipelago
Malayan archipelago
04 - Natural Selection 04-13 - Convergence of Character 60 What then checks an indefinite increase in the number of species?

The amount of life (I do not mean the number of specific forms) supported on an area must have a limit, depending so largely as it does on physical conditions; therefore, if an area be inhabited by very many species, each or nearly each species will be represented by few individuals; and such species will be liable to extermination from accidental fluctuations in the nature of the seasons or in the number of their enemies.
05 - Laws of Variation 05-02 - Use and Disuse of Parts, combined with Natural Selection, Organs of Flight and Vision 60 It is well known that several animals, belonging to the most different classes, which inhabit the caves of Carniola and of Kentucky, are blind. in some of the crabs the foot-stalk for the eye remains, though the eye is gone;- the stand for the telescope is there, though the telescope with its glasses has been lost.

cave
cave

Kentucky
Kentucky

crab
crab

telescope
telescope

glasses
glasses


As it is difficult to imagine that eyes, though useless, could be in any way injurious to animals living in darkness, their loss may be attributed to disuse. In one of the blind animals, namely, the cave-rat (Noetoma), two of which were captured by Professor Silliman at above half a mile distance from the mouth of the cave, and therefore not in the profoundest depths, the eyes were lustrous and of large size; and these animals, as I am informed by Professor Silliman, after having been exposed for about a month to a graduated light, acquired a dim perception of objects.