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OriginOfSpecies - 475 Rows
Column Type #Values Column Stats
id int(11) 475 Column Stats
subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
ordinal int(11) 30 Column Stats
description text 474 Column Stats

475 rows, page 110 of 119 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies order by subject limit 436, 4 (Page 110: Row)
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13 - Mutual Affinities of Organic Beings: Morphology: Embryology: Rudimentary Or 13-05 - Descent always used in classification 20 But it may be asked, what ought we to do, if it could be proved that one species of kangaroo had been produced, by a long course of modification, from a bear?

kangaroo
kangaroo

bear
bear


Ought we to rank this one species with bears, and what should we do with the other species?

The supposition is of course preposterous; and I might answer by the argumentum ad hominem, and ask what should be done if a perfect kangaroo were seen to come out of the womb of a bear?

According to all analogy, it would be ranked with bears; but then assuredly all the other species of the kangaroo family would have to be classed under the bear genus.

The whole case is preposterous; for where there has been close descent in common, there will certainly be close resemblance or affinity.
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-03 - Causes of the general belief in the immutability of species 30 On the view of all the species of the same genus having descended from a common parent, and having inherited much in common, we can understand how it is that allied species, when placed under considerably different conditions of life, yet should follow nearly the same instincts; why the thrush of South America, for instance, lines her nest with mud like our British species.

thrush
thrush

South America
South America

England
England


On the view of instincts having been slowly acquired through natural selection we need not marvel at some instincts being apparently not perfect and liable to mistakes, and at many instincts causing other animals to suffer.

If species be only well-marked and permanent varieties, we can at once see why their crossed offspring should follow the same complex laws in their degrees and kinds of resemblance to their parents, -- in being absorbed into each other by successive crosses, and in other such points, -- as do the crossed offspring of acknowledged varieties.

On the other hand, these would be strange facts if species have been independently created, and varieties have been produced by secondary laws.
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-03 - Causes of the general belief in the immutability of species 70 The existence of closely allied or representative species in any two areas, implies, on the theory of descent with modification, that the same parents formerly inhabited both areas; and we almost invariably find that wherever many closely allied species inhabit two areas, some identical species common to both still exist.

Wherever many closely allied yet distinct species occur, many doubtful forms and varieties of the same species likewise occur.

It is a rule of high generality that the inhabitants of each area are related to the inhabitants of the nearest source whence immigrants might have been derived.

We see this in nearly all the plants and animals of the Galapagos archipelago, of Juan Fernandez, and of the other American islands being related in the most striking manner to the plants and animals of the neighbouring American mainland; and those of the Cape de Verde archipelago and other African islands to the African mainland.

Galapagos Islands
Galapagos Islands

Juan Fernandez Islands
Juan Fernandez Islands


It must be admitted that these facts receive no explanation on the theory of creation.
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-03 - Causes of the general belief in the immutability of species 90 The similarity of pattern in the wing and leg of a bat, though used for such different purposes, -- in the jaws and legs of a crab, -- in the petals, stamens, and pistils of a flower, is likewise intelligible on the view of the gradual modification of parts or organs, which were alike in the early progenitor of each class.

bat
bat

crab
crab

petals
petals

stamen
stamen

pistil
pistil