RTB
M Database Inspector (cheetah)
Not logged in. Login


133 rows, page 15 of 34 (4/p)
1 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 30 34

Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '10' order by description desc limit 56, 4 (Page 15: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is last)
10 - On The Geological Succession of Organic Beings 10-09 - On the succession of the same types within the same areas 10 Mr Clift many years ago showed that the fossil mammals from the Australian caves were closely allied to the living marsupials of that continent.

Australia
Australia

mammals
mammals

marsupials
marsupials


In South America, a similar relationship is manifest, even to an uneducated eye, in the gigantic pieces of armour like those of the armadillo, found in several parts of La Plata; and Professor Owen has shown in the most striking manner that most of the fossil mammals, buried there in such numbers, are related to South American types.

South America
South America

armadillo
armadillo

La Plata
La Plata

Richard Owen
Richard Owen


This relationship is even more clearly seen in the wonderful collection of fossil bones made by MM. Lund and Clausen in the caves of Brazil.

Peter Wilhelm Lund
Peter Wilhelm Lund

Brazil
Brazil


I was so much impressed with these facts that I strongly insisted, in 1839 and 1845, on this `law of the succession of types,' on `this wonderful relationship in the same continent between the dead and the living.' Professor Owen has subsequently extended the same generalisation to the mammals of the Old World.

We see the same law in this author's restorations of the extinct and gigantic birds of New Zealand.

Extinct Birds of New Zealand
Extinct Birds of New Zealand


We see it also in the birds of the caves of Brazil.

Mr Woodward has shown that the same law holds good with sea-shells, but from the wide distribution of most genera of molluscs, it is not well displayed by them.

Sea Shell
Sea Shell

mollusca
mollusca


Other cases could be added, as the relation between the extinct and living land-shells of Madeira; and between the extinct and living brackish-water shells of the Aralo-Caspian Sea.

Land Shell
Land Shell

Madeira
Madeira

Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea


Now what does this remarkable law of the succession of the same types within the same areas mean?

He would be a bold man, who after comparing the present climate of Australia and of parts of South America under the same latitude, would attempt to account, on the one hand, by dissimilar physical conditions for the dissimilarity of the inhabitants of these two continents, and, on the other hand, by similarity of conditions, for the uniformity of the same types in each during the later tertiary periods.

Australia
Australia

South America
South America


Nor can it be pretended that it is an immutable law that marsupials should have been chiefly or solely produced in Australia; or that Edentata and other American types should have been solely produced in South America.

edentata
edentata


For we know that Europe in ancient times was peopled by numerous marsupials; and I have shown in the publications above alluded to, that in America the law of distribution of terrestrial mammals was formerly different from what it now is.

North America formerly partook strongly of the present character of the southern half of the continent; and the southern half was formerly more closely allied, than it is at present, to the northern half.

In a similar manner we know from Falconer and Cautley's discoveries, that northern India was formerly more closely related in its mammals to Africa than it is at the present time.

Hugh Falconer
Hugh Falconer

India
India

Africa
Africa


Analogous facts could be given in relation to the distribution of marine animals.

On the theory of descent with modification, the great law of the long enduring, but not immutable, succession of the same types within the same areas, is at once explained; for the inhabitants of each quarter of the world will obviously tend to leave in that quarter, during the next succeeding period of time, closely allied though in some degree modified descendants.

If the inhabitants of one continent formerly differed greatly from those of another continent, so will their modified descendants still differ in nearly the same manner and degree.

But after very long intervals of time and after great geographical changes, permitting much inter-migration, the feebler will yield to the more dominant forms, and there will be nothing immutable in the laws of past and present distribution.

It may be asked in ridicule, whether I suppose that the megatherium and other allied huge monsters have left behind them in South America the sloth, armadillo, and anteater, as their degenerate descendants.

South America
South America

sloth
sloth

armadillo
armadillo

anteater
anteater


This cannot for an instant be admitted.

These huge animals have become wholly extinct, and have left no progeny.

But in the caves of Brazil, there are many extinct species which are closely allied in size and in other characters to the species still living in South America; and some of these fossils may be the actual progenitors of living species.

It must not be forgotten that, on my theory, all the species of the same genus have descended from some one species; so that if six genera, each having eight species, be found in one geological formation, and in the next succeeding formation there be six other allied or representative genera with the same number of species, then we may conclude that only one species of each of the six older genera has left modified descendants, constituting the six new genera.

The other seven species of the old genera have all died out and have left no progeny.

Or, which would probably be a far commoner case, two or three species of two or three alone of the six older genera will have been the parents of the six new genera; the other old species and the other whole genera having become utterly extinct.

In failing orders, with the genera and species decreasing in numbers, as apparently is the case of the Edentata of South America, still fewer genera and species will have left modified blood-descendants.
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-03 - correlation of Growth 10 Many laws regulate variation, some few of which can be dimly seen, and will hereafter be briefly discussed.

I will here only allude to what may be called correlated variation. Important changes in the embryo or larva will probably entail changes in the mature animal.

In monstrosities, the correlations between quite distinct parts are very curious; and many instances are given in Isidore Geoffroy St-Hilaire's great work on this subject.
Isidore Geoffroy Saint Hilaire
Isidore Geoffroy Saint Hilaire


Breeders believe that long limbs are almost always accompanied by an elongated head.

Some instances of correlation are quite whimsical: thus cats which are entirely white and have blue eyes are generally deaf;

but it has been lately stated by Mr. Tait that this is confined to the males.

Colour and constitutional peculiarities go together, of which many remarkable cases could be given amongst animals and plants.
From facts collected by Heusinger, it appears that white sheep and pigs are injured by certain plants, whilst dark-coloured individuals escape:

sheep
sheep

pig
pig
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-09 - Complex Relations of all Animals and Plants Throughout Nature 10 Many cases are on record showing how complex and unexpected are the checks and relations between organic beings, which have to struggle together in the same country.

I will give only a single instance, which, though a simple one, interested me.

In Staffordshire, on the estate of a relation, where I had ample means of investigation, there was a large and extremely barren heath, which had never been touched by the hand of man; but several hundred acres of exactly the same nature had been enclosed twenty-five years previously and planted with Scotch fir.

The change in the native vegetation of the planted part of the heath was most remarkable, more than is generally seen in passing from one quite different soil to another: not only the proportional numbers of the heath-plants were wholly changed, but twelve species of plants (not counting grasses and carices) flourished in the plantations, which could not be found on the heath.

heath
heath

Scotch Fir
Scotch Fir

cattle
cattle


The effect on the insects must have been still greater, for six insectivorous birds were very common in the plantations, which were not to be seen on the heath; and the heath was frequented by two or three distinct insectivorous birds.

Here we see how potent has been the effect of the introduction of a single tree, nothing whatever else having been done, with the exception of the land having been enclosed, so that cattle could not enter.

But how important an element enclosure is, I plainly saw near Farnham, in Surrey. Here there are extensive heaths, with a few clumps of old Scotch firs on the distant hilltops: within the last ten years large spaces have been enclosed, and self-sown firs are now springing up in multitudes, so close together that all cannot live.

When I ascertained that these young trees had not been sown or planted, I was so much surprised at their numbers that I went to several points of view, whence I could examine hundreds of acres of the unenclosed heath, and literally I could not see a single Scotch fir, except the old planted clumps.

But on looking closely between the stems of the heath, I found a multitude of seedlings and little trees which had been perpetually browsed down by the cattle. In one square yard, at a point some hundred yards distant from one of the old clumps, I counted thirty-two little trees; and one of them, with twenty-six rings of growth, had, during many years, tried to raise its head above the stems of the heath, and had failed.

No wonder that, as soon as the land was enclosed, it became thickly clothed with vigorously growing young firs.

Yet the heath was so extremely barren and so extensive that no one would ever have imagined that cattle would have so closely and effectually searched it for food.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-01 - Difficulties on the Theory of Descent with Modification 10 Long before having arrived at this part of my work, a crowd of difficulties will have occurred to the reader. Some of them are so grave that to this day I can never reflect on them without being staggered; but, to the best of my judgment, the greater number are only apparent, and those that are real are not, I think, fatal to my theory.

These difficulties and objections may be classed under the following heads:-Firstly, why, if species have descended from other species by insensibly fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms? Why is not all nature in confusion instead of the species being, as we see them, well defined?