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133 rows, page 14 of 34 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '10' order by description limit 52, 4 (Page 14: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is first)
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-05 - Nature of the Checks to Increase 10 In looking at Nature, it is most necessary to keep the foregoing considerations always in mind- never to forget that every single organic being may be said to be striving to the utmost to increase in numbers; that each lives by a struggle at some period of its life; that heavy destruction inevitably falls either on the young or old, during each generation or at recurrent intervals. Lighten any cheek, mitigate the destruction ever so little, and the number of the species will
almost instantaneously increase to any amount.
04 - Natural Selection 04-07 - Illustrations of the Action of Natural Selection: 10 In order to make it clear how, as I believe, natural selection acts, I must beg permission to give one or two imaginary illustrations.

Let us take the case of a wolf, which preys on various animals, securing some by craft, some by strength, and some by fleetness; and let us suppose that the fleetest prey, a deer for instance, had from any change in the country increased in numbers, or that other prey had decreased in numbers, during that season of the year when the wolf was hardest pressed for food. Under such circumstances the swiftest and slimmest wolves would have the best chance of surviving and so be preserved or selected,- provided always that they retained strength to master their prey at this or some other period of the year, when they were compelled to prey on other animals.

wolf
wolf

deer
deer


I can see no more reason to doubt that this would be the result, than that man should be able to improve the fleetness of his greyhounds by careful and methodical selection, or by that kind of unconscious selection which follows from each man trying to keep the best dogs without any thought of modifying the breed.

dog
dog
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-07 - Origin of Domestic Varieties from one or more Species 10 In the case of most of our anciently domesticated animals and plants, it is not possible to come to any definite conclusion, whether they are descended from one or several wild species.

The argument mainly relied on by those who believe in the multiple origin of our domestic animals is, that we find in the most ancient times, on the monuments of Egypt, and in the lake-habitations of Switzerland, much diversity in the breeds;

Egypt
Egypt

Switzerland
Switzerland



and that some of these ancient breeds closely resemble, or are even identical with, those still existing.

But this only throws far backwards the history of civilisation, and shows that animals were domesticated at a much earlier period than has hitherto been supposed.
14 - Recapitulation and Conclusion 14-06 - Concluding remarks 10 In the distant future I see open fields for far more important researches. Psychology will be based on a new foundation, that of the necessary acquirement of each mental power and capacity by gradation. Light will be thrown on the origin of man and his history.
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Authors of the highest eminence seem to be fully satisfied with the view that each species has been independently created.

To my mind it accords better with what we know of the laws impressed on matter by the Creator, that the production and extinction of the past and present inhabitants of the world should have been due to secondary causes, like those determining the birth and death of the individual.

When I view all beings not as special creations, but as the lineal descendants of some few beings which lived long before the first bed of the Silurian system was deposited, they seem to me to become ennobled.

Judging from the past, we may safely infer that not one living species will transmit its unaltered likeness to a distant futurity.

And of the species now living very few will transmit progeny of any kind to a far distant futurity; for the manner in which all organic beings are grouped, shows that the greater number of species of each genus, and all the species of many genera, have left no descendants, but have become utterly extinct.

We can so far take a prophetic glance into futurity as to foretel that it will be the common and widely-spread species, belonging to the larger and dominant groups, which will ultimately prevail and procreate new and dominant species.