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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '10' order by description limit 72, 4 (Page 19: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is first)
10 - On The Geological Succession of Organic Beings 10-01 - On the slow and successive appearance of new species 10 Let us now see whether the several facts and rules relating to the geological succession of organic beings, better accord with the common view of the immutability of species, or with that of their slow and gradual modification, through descent and natural selection.

New species have appeared very slowly, one after another, both on the land and in the waters.

Lyell has shown that it is hardly possible to resist the evidence on this head in the case of the several tertiary stages; and every year tends to fill up the blanks between them, and to make the percentage system of lost and new forms more gradual.

Sir Charles Lyell
Sir Charles Lyell


In some of the most recent beds, though undoubtedly of high antiquity if measured by years, only one or two species are lost forms, and only one or two are new forms, having here appeared for the first time, either locally, or, as far as we know, on the face of the earth.

If we may trust the observations of Philippi in Sicily, the successive changes in the marine inhabitants of that island have been many and most gradual.

Rodolfo Armando Philippi
Rodolfo Armando Philippi

Sicily
Sicily


The secondary formations are more broken; but, as Bronn has remarked, neither the appearance nor disappearance of their many now extinct species has been simultaneous in each separate formation.

Heinrich Georg Bronn
Heinrich Georg Bronn
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-01 - Difficulties on the Theory of Descent with Modification 10 Long before having arrived at this part of my work, a crowd of difficulties will have occurred to the reader. Some of them are so grave that to this day I can never reflect on them without being staggered; but, to the best of my judgment, the greater number are only apparent, and those that are real are not, I think, fatal to my theory.

These difficulties and objections may be classed under the following heads:-Firstly, why, if species have descended from other species by insensibly fine gradations, do we not everywhere see innumerable transitional forms? Why is not all nature in confusion instead of the species being, as we see them, well defined?
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-09 - Complex Relations of all Animals and Plants Throughout Nature 10 Many cases are on record showing how complex and unexpected are the checks and relations between organic beings, which have to struggle together in the same country.

I will give only a single instance, which, though a simple one, interested me.

In Staffordshire, on the estate of a relation, where I had ample means of investigation, there was a large and extremely barren heath, which had never been touched by the hand of man; but several hundred acres of exactly the same nature had been enclosed twenty-five years previously and planted with Scotch fir.

The change in the native vegetation of the planted part of the heath was most remarkable, more than is generally seen in passing from one quite different soil to another: not only the proportional numbers of the heath-plants were wholly changed, but twelve species of plants (not counting grasses and carices) flourished in the plantations, which could not be found on the heath.

heath
heath

Scotch Fir
Scotch Fir

cattle
cattle


The effect on the insects must have been still greater, for six insectivorous birds were very common in the plantations, which were not to be seen on the heath; and the heath was frequented by two or three distinct insectivorous birds.

Here we see how potent has been the effect of the introduction of a single tree, nothing whatever else having been done, with the exception of the land having been enclosed, so that cattle could not enter.

But how important an element enclosure is, I plainly saw near Farnham, in Surrey. Here there are extensive heaths, with a few clumps of old Scotch firs on the distant hilltops: within the last ten years large spaces have been enclosed, and self-sown firs are now springing up in multitudes, so close together that all cannot live.

When I ascertained that these young trees had not been sown or planted, I was so much surprised at their numbers that I went to several points of view, whence I could examine hundreds of acres of the unenclosed heath, and literally I could not see a single Scotch fir, except the old planted clumps.

But on looking closely between the stems of the heath, I found a multitude of seedlings and little trees which had been perpetually browsed down by the cattle. In one square yard, at a point some hundred yards distant from one of the old clumps, I counted thirty-two little trees; and one of them, with twenty-six rings of growth, had, during many years, tried to raise its head above the stems of the heath, and had failed.

No wonder that, as soon as the land was enclosed, it became thickly clothed with vigorously growing young firs.

Yet the heath was so extremely barren and so extensive that no one would ever have imagined that cattle would have so closely and effectually searched it for food.
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-03 - correlation of Growth 10 Many laws regulate variation, some few of which can be dimly seen, and will hereafter be briefly discussed.

I will here only allude to what may be called correlated variation. Important changes in the embryo or larva will probably entail changes in the mature animal.

In monstrosities, the correlations between quite distinct parts are very curious; and many instances are given in Isidore Geoffroy St-Hilaire's great work on this subject.
Isidore Geoffroy Saint Hilaire
Isidore Geoffroy Saint Hilaire


Breeders believe that long limbs are almost always accompanied by an elongated head.

Some instances of correlation are quite whimsical: thus cats which are entirely white and have blue eyes are generally deaf;

but it has been lately stated by Mr. Tait that this is confined to the males.

Colour and constitutional peculiarities go together, of which many remarkable cases could be given amongst animals and plants.
From facts collected by Heusinger, it appears that white sheep and pigs are injured by certain plants, whilst dark-coloured individuals escape:

sheep
sheep

pig
pig