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05 - Laws of Variation 05-11 - Species of the Same Genus Vary in an Analogous Manner 10 Distinct Species present analagous Variations, so that a Variety of one Species often assumes a Character proper to an Allied Species, or reverts to some of the Characters of an early Progenitor.- These propositions will be most readily understood by looking to our domestic races.

The most distinct breeds of the pigeon, in countries widely apart, present sub-varieties with reversed feathers on the head, and with feathers on the feet,- characters not possessed by the aboriginal rock-pigeon; these then are analogous variations in two or more distinct races.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon


The frequent presence of fourteen or even sixteen tail-feathers in the pouter may be considered as a variation representing the normal structure of another race, the fan-tail.

Pouter Pigeon
Pouter Pigeon

Fantail Pigeon
Fantail Pigeon


I presume that no one will doubt that all such analogous variations are due to the several races of the pigeon having inherited from a common parent the same constitution and tendency to variation, when acted on by similar unknown influences.

In the vegetable kingdom we have a case of analogous variation, in the enlarged stems, or as commonly called roots, of the Swedish turnip and Rutabaga, plants which several botanists rank as varieties produced by cultivation from a common parent: if this be not so, the case will then be one of analogous variation in two so-called distinct species; and to these a third may be added, namely, the common turnip.

turnip
turnip


According to the ordinary view of each species having been independently created, we should have to attribute this similarity in the enlarged stems of these three plants, not to the vera causa of community of descent, and a consequent tendency to vary in a like manner, but to three separate yet closely related acts of creation.
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-11 - The Relation of Organism to Organism the Most Important of All Relations 10 A corollary of the highest importance may be deduced from the foregoing remarks, namely, that the structure of every organic being is related, in the most essential yet often hidden manner, to that of all the other organic beings, with which it comes into competition for food or residence, or from which it has to escape, or on which it preys.

This is obvious in the structure of the teeth and talons of the tiger; and in that of the legs and claws of the parasite which clings to the hair on the tiger's body.

talon
talon

tiger
tiger

Head Louse Claw
Head Louse Claw


But in the beautifully plumed seed of the dandelion, and in the flattened and fringed legs of the water-beetle, the relation seems at first confined to the elements of air and
water.

dandelion
dandelion

flying seeds
flying seeds

Water Beetle
Water Beetle


Yet the advantage of plumed seeds no doubt stands in the closest relation to the land being already thickly clothed with other plants; so that the seeds may be widely distributed and fall on unoccupied ground.

In the water-beetle, the structure of its legs, so well adapted for diving, allows it to compete with other aquatic insects, to hunt for its own prey, and to escape serving as prey to other animals.
03 - Struggle for Existence 03-10 - Struggle for Life most severe between Individuals and Varieties of the same Species 10 As the species of the same genus usually have, though by no means invariably, much similarity in habits and constitution, and always in structure, the struggle will generally be more severe between them, if they come into competition with each other, than between the species of distinct genera.

We see this in the recent extension over parts of the United States of one species of swallow having caused the decrease of another species.

United States
United States

swallow
swallow


The recent increase of the missel-thrush in parts of Scotland has caused the decrease of the song-thrush.

Scotland
Scotland

Missel Thrush
Missel Thrush

Song Thrush
Song Thrush
04 - Natural Selection 04-05 - Sexual Selection 10 Inasmuch as peculiarities often appear under domestication in one sex and become hereditarily attached to that sex, so no doubt it will be under nature.

Thus it is rendered possible for the two sexes to be modified through natural selection in relation to different habits of life, as is sometimes the case; or for one sex to be modified in relation to the other sex, as commonly occurs.

This leads me to say a few words on what I have called Sexual Selection. This form of selection depends, not on a struggle for existence in relation to other organic beings or to external conditions, but on a struggle between the individuals of one sex, generally the males, for the possession of the other sex.

The result is not death to the unsuccessful competitor, but few or no offspring. Sexual selection is, therefore, less rigorous than natural selection.

Generally, the most vigorous males, those which are best fitted for their places in nature, will leave most progeny.

But in many cases, victory depends not so much on general vigor, as on having special weapons, confined to the male sex.

A hornless stag or spurless cock would have a poor chance of leaving numerous offspring.

stag
stag

cock
cock

spurs
spurs


Sexual selection, by always allowing the victor to breed, might surely give indomitable courage, length to the spur, and strength to the wing to strike in the spurred leg, in nearly the same manner as does the brutal cockfighter by the careful selection of his best cocks.

cockfight
cockfight


How low in the scale of nature the law of battle descends, I know not; male alligators have been described as fighting, bellowing, and whirling round, like Indians in a war-dance, for the possession of the females; male salmons have been observed fighting all day long; male stagbeetles sometimes bear wounds from the huge mandibles of other males; the males of certain hymenopterous insects have been frequently seen by that inimitable observer M. Fabre, fighting for a particular female who sits by, an apparently unconcerned beholder of the struggle, and then retires with the conqueror.

alligator
alligator

crocodile
crocodile

Stag Beetle
Stag Beetle

Indian
Indian


The war is, perhaps, severest between the males of polygamous animals, and these seem oftenest provided with special weapons.

The males of carnivorous animals are already well armed; though to them and to others, special means of defence may be given through means of sexual selection, as the mane of the lion, and the hooked jaw to the male salmon; for the shield may be as important for victory, as the sword or spear.

mane
mane

salmon
salmon

sword
sword

spear
spear