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52 rows, page 8 of 13 (4/p)
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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '30' order by subject, title, ordinal limit 28, 4 (Page 8: Row)
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05 - Laws of Variation 05-10 - Secondary Sexual Characters Variable 30 Finally, then, I conclude that the greater variability of specific characters, or those which distinguish species from species, than of generic characters, or those which are possessed by all the species;- that the frequent extreme variability of an part which is developed in a species in an extraordinary manner in comparison with the same part in its congeners; and the slight degree of variability in a part, however extraordinarily it may be developed, if it be common to a whole group of species;- that the great variability of secondary sexual characters, and their great difference in closely allied species;- that secondary sexual and ordinary specific differences are generally displayed in the same parts of the organisation,- are all principles closely connected together.

All being mainly due to the species of the same group being the descendants of common progenitor, from whom they have inherited much in common,- to parts which have recently and largely varied being more likely still to go on varying than parts which have long been inherited and have not varied,- to natural selection having more or less completely, according to the lapse of time, overmastered the tendency to reversion and to further variability,- to sexual selection being less rigid than ordinary selection,- and to variations in the same parts having been accumulated by natural and sexual selection, and having been thus adapted for secondary sexual, and for ordinary purposes.
05 - Laws of Variation 05-12 - Reversion to Long Lost Characters 30 A considerable catalogue, also, could be given of forms intermediate between two other forms, which themselves can only doubtfully be ranked as species; and this shows, unless all these closely allied forms be considered as independently created species, that they have in varying assumed some of the characters of the others.

But the best evidence of analogous variations is afforded by parts or organs which are generally constant in character, but which occasionally vary so as to resemble, in some degree, the same part or organ in an allied species.

I have collected a long list of such cases; but here, as before, I lie under the great disadvantage of not being able to give them.

I can only repeat that such cases certainly occur, and seem to me very remarkable.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-01 - Difficulties on the Theory of Descent with Modification 30 Thirdly, can instincts be acquired and modified through natural selection? What shall we say to so marvellous an instinct as that which leads the bee to make cells, which have practically anticipated the discoveries of profound mathematicians?
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-03 - Absence or Rarity of Transitional Varieties 30 In the first place we should be extremely cautious in inferring, because an area is now continuous, that it has been continuous during a long period.

Geology would lead us to believe that most continents have been broken up into islands even during the later tertiary periods; and in such islands distinct species might have been separately formed without the possibility of intermediate varieties existing in the intermediate zones.

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By changes in the form of the land and of climate, marine areas now continuous must often have existed within recent times in a far less continuous and uniform condition than at present.

But I will pass over this way of escaping from the difficulty; for I believe that many perfectly defined species have been formed on strictly continuous areas; though I do not doubt that the formerly broken condition of areas now continuous, has played an important part in the formation of new species, more especially with freely-crossing and wandering animals.