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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '40' order by subject, title, ordinal limit 28, 4 (Page 8: Row)
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06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-09 - Cases of Difficulty 40 In the foregoing cases, we see the same end gained and the same function performed, in beings not at all or only remotely allied, by organs in appearance, though not in development, closely similar.

On the other hand, it is a common rule throughout nature that the same end should be gained, even sometimes in the case of closely-related beings, by the most diversified means.

How differently constructed is the feathered wing of a bird and the membrane-covered wing of a bat; and still more so the four wings of a butterfly, the two wings of a fly, and the two wings with the elytra of a beetle.
bird
bird

bat
bat

butterfly
butterfly

fly
fly

beetle
beetle

elytra
elytra


Bivalve shells are made to open and shut, but on what a number of patterns is the hinge constructed,- from the long row of neatly interlocking teeth in a Nucula to the simple ligament of a Mussel!
Sea Shell
Sea Shell

nucula
nucula

mussel
mussel


Seeds are disseminated by their minuteness,- by their capsule being converted into a light balloon-like envelope,- by being embedded in pulp or flesh, formed of the most diverse parts, and rendered nutritious, as well as conspicuously coloured, so as to attract and be devoured by birds,- by having hooks and grapnels of many kinds and serrated arms, so as to adhere to the fur of quadrupeds,- and by being furnished with wings and plumes, as different in shape as they are elegant in structure, so as to be wafted by every breeze.
Flying Seeds
Flying Seeds


I will give one other instance; for this subject of the same end being gained by the most diversified means well deserves attention.

Some authors maintain that organic beings have been formed in many ways for the sake of mere variety, almost like toys in a shop, but such a view of nature is incredible.

With plants having separated sexes, and with those in which, though hermaphrodites, the pollen does not spontaneously fall on the stigma, some aid is necessary for their fertilisation.

With several kinds this is effected by the pollen-grains, which are light and incoherent, being blown by the wind through mere chance on to the stigma; and this is the simplest plan which can well be conceived.
pollen
pollen


An almost equally simple, though very different, plan occurs in many plants in which a symmetrical flower secretes a few drops of nectar, and is consequently visited by insects; and these carry the pollen from the anthers to the stigma.
anther
anther
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-11 - Organs of Small Importance 40 In the second place, we may easily err in attributing importance to characters, and in believing that they have been developed through natural selection.

We must by no means overlook the effects of the definite action of changed conditions of life,- of so-called spontaneous variations, which seem to depend in a quite subordinate degree on the nature of the conditions,- of the tendency to reversion to long-lost characters,- of the complex laws of growth, such as of correlation, compensation, of the pressure of one part on another, &c.,- and finally of sexual selection, by which characters of use to one sex are often gained and then transmitted more or less perfectly to the other sex, though of no use to this sex.

But structures thus indirectly gained, although at first of no advantage to a species, may subsequently have been taken advantage of by its modified descendants, under new conditions of life and newly acquired habits.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-12 - Organs not in all Cases Absolutely Perfect 40 With respect to the belief that organic beings have been created beautiful for the delight of man,- a belief which it has been pronounced is subversive of my whole theory,- I may first remark that the sense of beauty obviously depends on the nature of the mind, irrespective of any real quality in the admired object; and that the idea of what is beautiful, is not innate or unalterable.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-13 - Summary: The Law of Unity of Type and of the Conditions of Existence Embraced by the Theory of Natural Selection 40 Although the belief that an organ so perfect as the eye could have been formed by natural selection, is enough to stagger any one; yet in the case of any organ, if we know of a long series of gradations in complexity, each good for its possessor, then, under changing conditions of life, there is no logical impossibility in the acquirement of any conceivable degree of perfection through natural selection.
eye
eye


In the cases in which we know of no intermediate or transitional states, we should be extremely cautious in concluding that none can have existed, for the metamorphoses of many organs show what wonderful changes in function are at least possible.

For instance, a swimbladder has apparently been converted into an air-breathing lung.
Swim Bladder
Swim Bladder

lungs
lungs


The same organ having performed simultaneously very different functions, and then having been in part or in whole specialised for one function; and two distinct organs having performed at the same time the same function, the one having been perfected whilst aided by the other, must often have largely facilitated transitions.