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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '60' order by subject, title, ordinal limit 4 (Page 1: Row)
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01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-07 - Origin of Domestic Varieties from one or more Species 60 The doctrine of the origin of our several domestic races from several aboriginal stocks, has been carried to an absurd extreme by some authors.

They believe that every race which breeds true, let the distinctive characters be ever so slight, has had its wild prototype.

At this rate there must have existed at least a score of species of wild cattle, as many sheep, and several goats, in Europe alone, and several even within Great Britain.

cattle
cattle

sheep
sheep

goat
goat

Europe
Europe

England
England


One author believes that there formerly existed eleven wild species of sheep peculiar to Great Britain!

When we bear in mind that Britain has now not one peculiar mammal, and France but few distinct from those of Germany, and so with Hungary, Spain, &c., but that each of these kingdoms possesses several peculiar breeds of cattle, sheep, &c., we must admit that many domestic breeds must have originated in Europe; for whence otherwise could they have been derived?

So it is in India. Even in the case of the breeds of the domestic dog throughout the world, which I admit are descended from several wild species, it cannot be doubted that there has been an immense amount of inherited variation; for who will believe that animals closely resembling the Italian greyhound, the bloodhound, the bull-dog, pug-dog, or Blenheim spaniel, &c.- so unlike all wild Canidae ever existed in a state of nature?

greyhound
greyhound

bloodhound
bloodhound

bulldog
bulldog

pugdog
pugdog

spaniel
spaniel
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 60 Lastly, the hybrids or mongrels from between all the breeds of the pigeon are perfectly fertile, as I can state from my own observations, purposely made, on the most distinct breeds.

Now, hardly any cases have been ascertained with certainty of hybrids from two quite distinct species of animals being perfectly fertile.

Some authors believe that long-continued domestication eliminates this strong tendency to sterility in species.

From the history of the dog, and of some other domestic animals, this conclusion is probably quite correct, if applied to species closely related to each other.

But to extend it so far as to suppose that species, aboriginally as distinct as carriers, tumblers, pouters, and fantails now are, should yield offspring perfectly fertile inter se, would be rash in the extreme.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon

Dog
Dog
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-09 - Principles of Selection anciently followed, and their Effects 60 It may be objected that the principle of selection has been reduced to methodical practice for scarcely more than three-quarters of a century; it has certainly been more attended to of late years, and many treatises have been published on the subject; and the result has been, in a corresponding degree, rapid and important.

But it is very far from true that the principle is a modern discovery. I could give several references to works of high antiquity, in which the full importance of the principle is acknowledged. In rude and barbarous periods of English history choice animals were often imported, and laws were passed to prevent their exportation: the destruction of horses under a certain size was ordered, and this may be compared to the "roguing" of plants by nurserymen.

horse
horse


The principle of selection I find distinctly given in an ancient Chinese encyclopaedia.

Explicit rules are laid down by some of the Roman classical writers.

From passages in Genesis, it is clear that the colour of domestic animals was at that early period attended to.

Savages now sometimes cross their dogs with wild canine animals, to improve the breed, and they formerly did so, as is attested by passages in Pliny.

dog
dog


The savages in South Africa match their draught cattle by colour, as do some of the Esquimaux their teams of dogs.

cattle
cattle


Livingstone states that good domestic breeds are highly valued by the negroes in the interior of Africa who have not associated with Europeans.

Some of these facts do not show actual selection, but they show that the breeding of domestic animals was carefully attended to in ancient times, and is now attended to by the lowest savages. It would, indeed, have been a strange fact, had attention not been paid to breeding, for the inheritance of good and bad qualities is so
obvious.
02 - Variations Under Nature 02-03 - Doubtful Species 60 When a young naturalist commences the study of a group of organisms quite unknown to him, he is at first much perplexed in determining what differences to consider as specific, and what as varietal; for he knows nothing of the amount and kind of variation to which the group is subject; and this shows, at least, how very generally there is some variation.

But if he confine his attention to one class within one country, he will soon make up his mind how to rank most of the doubtful forms.

His general tendency will be to make many species, for he will become impressed, just like the pigeon or poultry fancier before alluded to, with the amount of difference in the forms which he is continually studying; and he has little general knowledge of analogical variation in other groups and in other countries, by which to correct his first impressions.

Pigeon
Pigeon

poultry
poultry


As he extends the range of his observations, he will meet with more cases of difficulty; for he will encounter a greater number of closely-allied forms.

But if his observations be widely extended, he will in the end generally be able to make up his own mind: but he will succeed in this at the expense of admitting much variation,- and the truth of this admission will often be disputed by other naturalists.

When he comes to study allied forms brought from countries not now continuous, in which case he cannot hope to find intermediate links, he will be compelled to trust almost entirely to analogy, and his difficulties will rise to a climax.