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Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where ordinal = '90' order by description limit 4 (Page 1: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is first)
04 - Natural Selection 04-11 - Divergence of Character 90 After the foregoing discussion, which has been much compressed, we may assume that the modified descendants of any one species will succeed so much the better as they become more diversified in structure, and are thus enabled to encroach on places occupied by other beings. Now let us see how this principle of benefit being derived from divergence of character, combined with the principles of natural selection and of extinction, tends to act.
06 - Difficutiles in Theory 06-12 - Organs not in all Cases Absolutely Perfect 90 How the sense of beauty in its simplest form- that is, the reception of a peculiar kind of pleasure from certain colours, forms, and sounds- was first developed in the mind of man and of the lower animals, is a very obscure subject.

The same sort of difficulty is presented, if we enquire how it is that certain flavours and odours give pleasure, and others displeasure.

Habit in all these cases appears to have come to a certain extent into play; but there must be some fundamental cause in the constitution of the nervous system in each species.
12 - Geographical Distribution -- continued 12-50 - On colonisation from the nearest source with subsequent modification 90 I can hardly doubt that this rule is generally true, though it would be difficult to prove it.

Amongst mammals, we see it strikingly displayed in Bats, and in a lesser degree in the Felidae and Canidae.

bat
bat

cat
cat

dog
dog


We see it, if we compare the distribution of butterflies and beetles.

butterfly
butterfly

beetle
beetle
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 90 I have discussed the probable origin of domestic pigeons at some, yet quite insufficient, length; because when I first kept pigeons and watched the several kinds, well knowing how truly they breed, I felt fully as much difficulty in believing that since they had been domesticated they had all proceeded from a common parent, as any naturalist could in coming to a similar conclusion in regard to the many species of finches, or other groups of birds, in nature. One circumstance has struck me much; namely, that nearly all the breeders of the various domestic animals and the cultivators of plants, with whom I have conversed, or whose treatises I have read, are firmly convinced that the several breeds to which each has attended, are descended from so many aboriginally distinct
species.

Ask, as I have asked, a celebrated raiser of Hereford cattle, whether his cattle might not have descended from long-horns, or both from a common parent-stock, and he will laugh you to scorn. I have never met a pigeon, or poultry, or duck, or rabbit fancier, who was not fully convinced that each main breed was descended from a distinct species.

Hereford Cow
Hereford Cow

Long Horn Cow
Long Horn Cow


Van Mons, in his treatise on pears and apples, shows how utterly he disbelieves that the several sorts, for instance a Ribston-pippin or Codlin-apple, could ever have proceeded from the seeds of the same tree.

Pear
Pear

apple
apple


Innumerable other examples could be given.

The explanation, I think, is simple: from long-continued study they are strongly impressed with the differences between the several races; and though they well know that each race varies slightly, for they win their prizes by selecting such slight differences, yet they ignore all general arguments, and refuse to sum up in their minds slight differences accumulated during many successive generations.

May not those naturalists who, knowing far less of the laws of inheritance than does the breeder, and knowing no more than he does of the intermediate links in the long lines of descent, yet admit that many of our domestic races are descended from the same parents- may they not learn a lesson of caution, when they deride the idea of species in a state of nature being lineal descendants of other species?