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subject varchar(80) 14 Column Stats
title varchar(250) 139 Column Stats
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01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 50 Some facts in regard to the colouring of pigeons well deserve consideration.

The rock-pigeon is of a slaty-blue, with white loins; but the Indian sub-species, C. intermedia of Strickland, has this part bluish. The tail has a terminal dark bar, with the outer feathers externally edged at the base with white. The wings have two black bars.

Some semi-domestic breeds, and some truly wild breeds, have, besides the two black bars, the wings chequered with black.

These several marks do not occur together in any other species of the whole family.

Now, in every one of the domestic breeds, taking thoroughly well-bred birds, all the above marks, even to the white edging of the outer tail-feathers, sometimes concur perfectly developed.

Moreover, when birds belonging to two or more distinct breeds are crossed, none of which are blue or have any of the above-specified marks, the mongrel offspring are very apt suddenly to acquire these characters.

To give one instance out of several which I have observed:- I crossed some white fantails, which breed very true, with some black barbs- and it so happens that blue varieties of barbs are so rare that I never heard of an instance in England; and the mongrels were black, brown, and mottled.

I also crossed a barb with a spot, which is a white bird with a red tail and red spot on the forehead, and which notoriously breeds very true; the mongrels were dusky and mottled.

I then crossed one of the mongrel barb-fantails with a mongrel barb-spot, and they produced a bird of as beautiful a blue colour, with the white loins, double black wing-bar, and barred and white-edged tail-feathers, as any wild-rock pigeon!

We can understand these facts, on the well-known principle of reversion to ancestral characters, if all the domestic breeds are descended from the rock-pigeon.

But if we deny this, we must make one of the two following highly improbable suppositions.

Either, first, that all the several imagined aboriginal stocks were coloured and marked like the rock-pigeon, although no other existing species is thuscoloured and marked, so that in each separate breed there might be a tendency to revert to the very same colours and markings.

Or, secondly, that each breed, even the purest, has within a dozen, or at most within a score, of generations, been crossed by the rock-pigeon: I say within dozen or twenty generations, for no instance is known of crossed descendants reverting to an ancestor of foreign blood, removed by a greater number of generations.

In a breed which has been crossed only once, the tendency to revert to any character derived from such a cross will naturally become less and less, as in each succeeding generation there will be less of the foreign blood; but when there has been no cross, and there is a tendency in the breed to revert to a character which was lost during some former generation, this tendency, for all that we can see to the contrary, may be transmitted undiminished for an indefinite number of generations.

These two distinct cases of reversion are often confounded
together by those who have written on inheritance.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 60 Lastly, the hybrids or mongrels from between all the breeds of the pigeon are perfectly fertile, as I can state from my own observations, purposely made, on the most distinct breeds.

Now, hardly any cases have been ascertained with certainty of hybrids from two quite distinct species of animals being perfectly fertile.

Some authors believe that long-continued domestication eliminates this strong tendency to sterility in species.

From the history of the dog, and of some other domestic animals, this conclusion is probably quite correct, if applied to species closely related to each other.

But to extend it so far as to suppose that species, aboriginally as distinct as carriers, tumblers, pouters, and fantails now are, should yield offspring perfectly fertile inter se, would be rash in the extreme.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon

Dog
Dog
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 70 From these several reasons, namely,- the improbability of man having formerly made seven or eight supposed species of pigeons to breed freely under domestication;- these supposed species being quite unknown in a wild state, and their not having become anywhere feral;- these species presenting certain very abnormal characters, as compared with all other Columbidae, though so like the rock-pigeon in most respects;- the occasional reappearance of the blue colour and various black marks in all the breeds, both when kept pure and when crossed;- and lastly, the mongrel offspring being perfectly fertile;- from these several reasons taken together, we may safely conclude that all our domestic breeds are descended from the rock-pigeon or Columba livia with its geographical sub-species.

Rock Pigeon
Rock Pigeon
01 - Variations Under Domestication 01-08 - Breeds of the Domestic Pigeons, their Differences and Origin 80 In favour of this view, I may add, firstly, that the wild C. livia has been found capable of domestication in Europe and in India; and that it agrees in habits and in a great number of points of structure with all the domestic breeds.

Secondly, that, although an English carrier or a short-faced tumbler differs immensely in certain characters from the rock-pigeon, yet that, by comparing the several sub-breeds of these two races, more especially those brought from distant countries, we can make, between them and the rock-pigeon, an almost perfect series; so we can in some other cases, but not with all the breeds.

Thirdly, those characters which are mainly distinctive of each breed are in each eminently variable, for instance the wattle and length of beak of the carrier, the shortness of that of the tumbler, and the number of tailfeathers in the fantail; and the explanation of this fact will be obvious when we treat of Selection.

Fourthly, pigeons have been watched and tended with the utmost care, and loved by many people.

They have been domesticated for thousands of years in several quarters of the world; the earliest known record of pigeons is in the fifth Egyptian dynasty, about 3000 B.C., as was pointed out to me by Professor Lepsius; but Mr. Birch informs me that pigeons are given in a bill of fare in the previous dynasty.

In the time of the Romans, as we hear from Pliny, immense prices were given for pigeons; "nay, they are come to this pass, that they can reckon up their pedigree and race."

Pigeons were much valued by Akber Khan in India, about the year 1600; never less than 90,000 pigeons were taken with the court.

"The monarchs of Iran and Turan sent him some very rare birds"; and continues the courtly historian, "His Majesty by crossing the breeds, which method was never practised before, has improved them astonishingly."

About this same period the Dutch were as eager about pigeons as were the old Romans.

The paramount importance of these considerations in explaining the immense amount of variation which pigeons have undergone, will likewise be obvious when we treat of Selection. We shall then, also, see how it is that the several breeds so often have a somewhat monstrous character.

It is also a most favourable circumstance for the production of distinct breeds, that male and female pigeons can be easily mated for life; and thus different breeds can be kept together in the same aviary.
aviary
aviary