M Database Inspector (cheetah)
Not logged in. Login


105 rows, page 24 of 27 (4/p)
1 10 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27

Export to Excel select * from OriginOfSpecies where subject = '04 - Natural Selection' order by description limit 92, 4 (Page 24: Row)
subject
title
ordinal
description Desending Order (top row is first)
04 - Natural Selection 04-11 - Divergence of Character 40 We can clearly discern this in the case of animals with simple habits.

Take the case of a carnivorous quadruped, of which the number that can be supported in any country has long ago arrived at its full average.

If its natural power of increase be allowed to act, it can succeed in increasing (the country not undergoing any change in conditions) only by its varying descendants seizing on places at present occupied by other animals: some of them, for instance, being enabled to feed on new kinds of prey, either dead or alive; some inhabiting new stations, climbing trees, frequenting water, and some perhaps becoming less carnivorous.

quadruped
quadruped

carnivore
carnivore

herbivore
herbivore


The more diversified in habits and structure the descendants of our carnivorous animals become, the more places they will be enabled to occupy.

What applies to one animal will apply throughout all time to all animals- that is, if they vary- for otherwise natural selection can effect nothing.

So it will be with plants. It has been experimentally proved, that if a plot of ground be sown with one species of grass, and a similar plot be sown with several distinct genera of grasses, a greater number of plants and a greater weight of dry herbage can be raised in the latter than in the former case.

grass
grass


The same has been found to hold good when one variety and several mixed varieties of wheat have been sown on equal spaces of ground.

wheat
wheat


Hence, if any one species of grass were to go on varying, and the varieties were continually selected which differed from each other in the same manner, though in a very slight degree, as do the distinct species and genera of grasses, a greater number of individual plants of this species, including its modified descendants, would succeed in living on the same piece of ground.

And we know that each species and each variety of grass is annually sowing almost countless seeds; and is thus striving, as it may be said, to the utmost to increase in number.

Consequently, in the course of many thousand generations, the most distinct varieties of any one species of grass would have the best chance of succeeding and of increasing in numbers, and thus of supplanting the less distinct varieties; and varieties, when rendered very distinct from each other, take the rank of species.

grass
grass
04 - Natural Selection 04-01 - Natural Selection 50 We have good reason to believe, as shown in the first chapter, that changes in the conditions of life give a tendency to increased variability; and in the foregoing cases the conditions have changed, and this would manifestly be favourable to natural selection, by affording a better chance of the occurrence of profitable variations.

Unless such occur, natural selection can do nothing.

Under the term of "variations," it must never be forgotten that mere individual differences are included.
04 - Natural Selection 04-11 - Divergence of Character 260 We have seen that in each country it is the species belonging to the larger genera which oftenest present varieties or incipient species.

This, indeed, might have been expected; for, as natural selection acts through one form having some advantage over other forms in the struggle for existence, it will chiefly act on those which already have some advantage; and the largeness of any group shows that its species have inherited from a common ancestor some advantage in common.

Hence, the struggle for the production of new and modified descendants will mainly lie between the larger groups which are all trying to increase in number.

One large group will slowly conquer another large group, reduce its numbers, and thus lessen its chance of further variation and improvement.

Within the same large group, the later and more highly perfected sub-groups, from branching out and seizing on many new places in the polity of Nature, will constantly tend to supplant and destroy the earlier and less improved sub-groups. Small and broken groups and sub-groups will finally disappear.

Looking to the future, we can predict that the groups of organic beings which are now large and triumphant, and which are least broken up, that is, which have as yet suffered least extinction, will, for a long period, continue to increase. But which groups will ultimately prevail, no man can predict; for we know that many groups formerly most extensively developed, have now become extinct.

Looking still more remotely to the future, we may predict that, owing to the continued and steady increase of the larger groups, a multitude of smaller groups will become utterly extinct, and leave no modified descendants; and consequently that, of the species living at any one period, extremely few will transmit descendants to a remote futurity.

I shall have to return to this subject in the chapter on Classification, but I may add that as, according to this view, extremely few of the more ancient species have transmitted descendants to the present day, and, as all the descendants of the same species form a class, we can understand how it is that there exist so few classes in each main division of the animal and vegetable kingdoms.

Although few of the most ancient species have left modified descendants' yet, at remote geological periods, the earth may have been almost as well peopled with species of many genera, families, orders, and classes, as at the present time.

Charles Darwin
Charles Darwin
04 - Natural Selection 04-14 - Summary of Chapter 30 We have seen that it is the common, the widely-diffused and widely-ranging species, belonging to the larger genera within each class, which vary most; and these tend to transmit to their modified offspring that superiority which now makes them dominant in their own countries.

Natural selection, as has just been remarked, leads to divergence of character and to much extinction of the less improved and intermediate forms of life.

On these principles, the nature of the affinities, and the generally well-defined distinctions between the innumerable organic beings in each class throughout the world, may be explained.

It is a truly wonderful fact- the wonder of which we are apt to overlook from familiarity- that all animals and all plants throughout all time and space should be related to each other in groups, subordinate to groups, in the manner which we everywhere behold- namely, varieties of the same species most closely related, species of the same genus less closely and unequally related, forming sections and sub-genera, species of distinct genera much less closely related, and genera related in different degrees, forming sub-families, families, orders, sub-classes and classes.

The several subordinate groups in any class cannot be ranked in a single file, but seem clustered round points, and these round other points, and so on in almost endless cycles.

If species had been independently created, no explanation would have been possible of this kind of classification; but it is explained through inheritance and the complex action of natural selection, entailing extinction and divergence of character, as we have seen illustrated in the diagram.
Full Size